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Has Anyone Refused Treatment. Opted For Palliative Care And A Assisted Death?

Has Anyone Refused Treatment. Opted For Palliative Care And A Assisted Death?

Where are the stats on how long you live without treatment ? How many people out of a Drs client base decide NOT to do Chemo?
where is info on how many people decide not to treat or give up on treatment. Anyone think treatment is worse the disease ?
Some NHL's are not curable. I want to know how those people deal with their life, Hospice and pain control.
Anyone besides me considering not treating.
I can't be the only one.

A MyLymphomaTeam Member said:

Palliative Care and Assisted death are very different. I did some research when I had a highly probably dx of bile duct CA. Quality of life is a high priority for me. (Note: they were wrong, it was sx that finally gave me a CA dx of NHFL.) There are only a few states that allow assisted death. California does allow it. However it does not sound like your current palliative care MD supports it. If that is truly what you want, it sounds like you should seek out a Dr that supports it. There can also be certain legalities that must be met - varying by state. I know that I had discussions with my hospital SW about it. This is currently not legal in Florida.

Palliative Care is meant to improve quality of life as opposed to cure - although those two things are not mutually exclusive. In the case of lymphoma, sometimes they do chemo, immuno or radiation therapies not to cure but to reduce the size of tumors (when they cause problems) / help alleviate symptoms. When I worked in hospice - many times the Drs would stop most / all medications on admission. It depended on the Dr, the patient and the family's wishes. IMHO, I did not believe that this was always the best choice for every patient or that they undersood that they had the right to stay on those routine meds. Of course, I am very big on being informed and knowing/making my own decisions.

I hope what I learned is helpful to you making your own decision.

edited, originally posted 28 days ago
A MyLymphomaTeam Member said:

Jeanette,

There are so many variables that affect prognosis. Some are easy to measure - like age, weight, and other health issues that you may have. Some are much harder to track and measure - but they can significantly affect your outcome: attitude, support, diet, and exercise to name a few.

I would hope that you do your own research on credible health sites in addition to asking your Dr. You may have a great oncologist who is up on all the studies or not. Her opinion may or may not match what others feel to be true. Prognoses can vary greatly and should be viewed as a possibility but not necessarily the only answer to your question.

Rebecca

posted about 1 month ago
A MyLymphomaTeam Member said:

Hi, Anne, You are asking some hard questions. Stats on how long after treatment or not taking treatment are not accurate because every case can be so different. Medicine has made so many advances since my husband was diagnosed 7.5 years ago. We are out of remission and dealing with Mantle Cell Lymphoma again.
How much do you have to Live For? My husband chose to fight 7.5 years ago because we had our life to live and 3 wonderful young Grandchildren to cherish and Love.
Everyone dealing with cancer has to make the best choice for themselves.
Mantle cell is not curable but it can be knocked into remission time and time again. We live our life a day at a time and try to cherish our time together. My husband is not in pain other than what old age throws at you. He actually never had pain when first diagnosed. We know there are pain meds available but are blessed not to need them. Hospice will be there if and when we need them to deal with each issue as it arises.
I can tell you that the treatments the first time around were not easy. I watched my husband feel sick and I often felt helpless in knowing how to help him. We learned how to take care of him through trial and error. Nausea was not the issue as much as not feeling hungry or thirsty and knowing I needed to push the fluids at him. Your treatment team will be there for you. We had some wonderful nurses and doctors to work with seven years ago and now have a new team of nurses and doctors.
I hope you find the answers you are looking for. Cancer is not a death sentence!
You can fight and live your life! Be Positive and find someone to talk to!

posted about 1 month ago
A MyLymphomaTeam Member said:

When I told my oncologist that I was not going to forego treatment and explained that the financial and emotional burden was too much for me. He stated it’s not all about the money I replied then treat me for free. He stated it doesn’t work that way. End of discussion.

posted 2 days ago
A MyLymphomaTeam Member said:

To update you all. I was first told I had weeks to months to live and tumor would double in size every week if I did not treat. Interestingly My mild symptoms have not progressed. My oncologist said the tumor has not grown as expected so maybe it isn't as aggressive as she thought. I did not treat. Now If I had started chemo and the tumor hadn't grown, do you think they would claim it was from chemo or because it hadn't grown as expected on it it's own?
Now maybe next week will be completely different and I'll be falling off the cliff [as I've come to think of it] but it is hard with my mild symtoms to imagine that now. I hope you have in your states the right to get end of life drugs. The laws are changing and we need the right to determine or own path, to control are own bodies. I am signed up with hospice.
Of course Dr's want to treat. They do not consider the costs emotional or financial that come with that treatment even when they think they do. My mother used to say. "The road to hell is paved with good intentions."

posted 9 days ago
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