Connect with others who understand.

sign up log in
About MyLymphomaTeam

Early Signs and Symptoms of Lymphocyte-Rich Hodgkin Lymphoma

Posted on April 14, 2022
Medically reviewed by
Mark Levin, M.D.
Article written by
Amanda Agazio, Ph.D.

Lymphocyte-rich Hodgkin lymphoma (LRHL) is a less common type of Hodgkin lymphoma. (Hodgkin lymphoma is the type of cancer that occurs when certain white blood cells in the immune system — known as lymphocytes — divide and multiply out of control.) Typically, Hodgkin lymphoma (also known as Hodgkin’s disease) occurs mostly in a person’s lymphatic system. However, Hodgkin lymphoma cancerous cells can also spread to other places in the body, such as the bone marrow.

There are two main types of Hodgkin lymphoma: classical Hodgkin lymphoma and nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma. Classical Hodgkin lymphoma, which includes LRHL, occurs more often. In fact, the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society reports classical Hodgkin lymphoma accounts for 95 percent of the cases of all Hodgkin lymphoma.

Classical Hodgkin lymphoma cases can be divided into four subtypes. These subtypes are grouped depending on the characteristics of the cancer cells a person has.

Within classical Hodgkin lymphoma, subtypes (and their frequencies) include:

There are some unique features of LRHL that make its early signs and symptoms different from what is observed with other types of classical Hodgkin lymphoma. It also shares some features with other types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Early Signs and Symptoms of LRHL

The early signs and symptoms of LRHL differ in some ways from the symptoms observed with other forms of classical Hodgkin lymphoma. The B symptoms typically experienced by most people with other types of classical Hodgkin lymphoma include night sweats, fever, and weight loss. However, only about 10 percent of people with LRHL will experience B symptoms.

Because B symptoms rarely show up in people with LRHL, it’s possible that few changes in the body will indicate a person has the disease. Some of the early symptoms that do appear in people with LRHL include fatigue and swollen or enlarged lymph nodes. These swollen lymph nodes are usually in the neck or armpits. Large tumor masses are not common in people with LRHL.

Even if you don’t have any masses, a doctor usually still needs to perform a biopsy and examine tissue samples for signs of LRHL — or another type of cancer. If they suspect LRHL, they will send the samples to a pathologist who then looks specifically for Reed-Sternberg cells. (Reed-Sternberg cells are cancerous cells that come from a type of lymphocyte called a B cell.) In someone with LRHL, Reed-Sternberg cells can appear in a pattern that is more scattered than in other classical Hodgkin lymphomas. Also, someone with LRHL has many normal lymphocytes, too. If the pathologist finds these two things — a scattered pattern and normal lymphocytes along with those that are cancerous — your doctor can confirm a diagnosis of LRHL.

Other Differentiators of LRHL

There are some other defining characteristics that make LRHL unique from the other types of classical Hodgkin lymphoma. For example, the average age of a person newly diagnosed with LRHL is older — 43 years old — when compared to people with other types of classical Hodgkin lymphomas. Even so, most lymphocyte-rich Hodgkin lymphomas are caught in the early stages (stages 1 and 2) of the disease. That’s in part because they might have swollen lymph nodes in areas (like the neck) that can easily be felt in a physical exam. People with LRHL have a better prognosis (outlook) than people with other forms of classical Hodgkin lymphoma. The complete remission rate is typically 95 percent, while the relapse rate (when cancer comes back after treatment) is 17 percent.

What Causes LRHL?

The cause of LRHL is thought to be similar to some of the other forms of classical Hodgkin lymphoma — genetic mutations, as well as infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV).

Genetic mutations can increase cell survival and activity (cause a cancer cell to live longer and grow more). Those traits give abnormal cells an advantage over normal cells and allow them to replicate out of control. Further, B cells can also become infected with EBV. That factors in because some of the viral proteins associated with EBV can enhance a cell’s signaling and help it survive.

Risk Factors for LRHL

There are some known risk factors associated with the development of LRHL and classical Hodgkin lymphoma in general. These risk factors include:

  • Gender — Males are twice as likely to have it (compared to females).
  • Family history — Risk level rises when family members (especially siblings) have had LRHL.
  • EBV — A past infection with EBV (the virus that causes mononucleosis or “mono”) is common among those with LRHL.
  • Immune system status — Having a weakened immune system increases someone’s risk.

Treatment for LRHL

Most cases of LRHL are detected at an early stage in the disease (stage 1 or 2). Early detection can lead to a better prognosis (outcome forecast) and better responses to treatment.

The treatment for LRHL generally consists of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. A common approach for classical Hodgkin lymphoma includes the chemotherapy regimen called ABVD.

Spelled out, ABVD includes the medications:

Newer drugs that can also be used include:

In cases that are more difficult to treat, a person with LRHL may undergo a stem cell transplant to replace their cancerous cells with healthy, noncancerous ones. This involves destroying cancerous blood cells with chemotherapy and replacing those with healthy new cells. In someone with a blood disease, a doctor transfers healthy stem cells into the person’s bone marrow or bloodstream. Healthy stem cells can come from the person undergoing treatment (autologous stem cell treatment) or from a donor (allogeneic stem cell transplants). To use someone with LDHL’s own stem cells, they must be collected before they undergo chemotherapy. The harvested matter then gets filtered to remove cancerous cells.

Connect With Others Who Understand

If you are living with lymphocyte-rich Hodgkin lymphoma (LRHL) — or any form of lymphoma — you are not alone. On MyLymphomaTeam, more than 11,000 members affected by lymphoma come together to ask questions, give advice, and share their experiences living with the condition.

Do you have LRHL? Share your experience in the comments below or start a conversation in MyLymphomaTeam.

All updates must be accompanied by text or a picture.
Mark Levin, M.D. is a hematology and oncology specialist with over 37 years of experience in internal medicine. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Learn more about him here.
Amanda Agazio, Ph.D. completed her doctorate in immunology at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. Her studies focused on the antibody response and autoimmunity. Learn more about her here.

Related articles

Night sweats are a common symptom of lymphoma. Sweating can occur in either of the two main types...

Sweating and Lymphoma

Night sweats are a common symptom of lymphoma. Sweating can occur in either of the two main types...
Lymphoma often includes many uncomfortable or painful symptoms, including aching joints or bone...

Aching Joints With Lymphoma: What Helps?

Lymphoma often includes many uncomfortable or painful symptoms, including aching joints or bone...
Lymphoma often makes it difficult to sleep. Many people who have lymphoma deal with disrupted...

How Does Lymphoma Cause Sleep Problems?

Lymphoma often makes it difficult to sleep. Many people who have lymphoma deal with disrupted...
Bone pain is a common symptom of lymphoma. As one MyLymphomaTeam member wrote, “I struggle with...

Bone Pain and Lymphoma

Bone pain is a common symptom of lymphoma. As one MyLymphomaTeam member wrote, “I struggle with...
One of the most uncomfortable side effects of lymphoma and its treatments is nausea. Nausea can...

Managing Nausea and Lymphoma

One of the most uncomfortable side effects of lymphoma and its treatments is nausea. Nausea can...
Many people worry about losing their hair after being diagnosed with lymphoma. Both treatments...

Hair Loss and Lymphoma

Many people worry about losing their hair after being diagnosed with lymphoma. Both treatments...

Recent articles

People with lymphoma at any stage can benefit from palliative care. This type of care can help...

Palliative Care: Improving Quality of Life With Lymphoma at Any Stage

People with lymphoma at any stage can benefit from palliative care. This type of care can help...
People over 50 and those who are immunocompromised are now eligible to get a second COVID-19...

What People With Lymphoma Should Know About Getting a Second COVID-19 Booster Shot

People over 50 and those who are immunocompromised are now eligible to get a second COVID-19...
Lymphocyte-depleted Hodgkin lymphoma (LDHL) is a rare type of classical Hodgkin lymphoma. Hodgkin...

What You Need To Know About Lymphocyte-Depleted Hodgkin Lymphoma: Symptoms, Treatment, and Prognosis

Lymphocyte-depleted Hodgkin lymphoma (LDHL) is a rare type of classical Hodgkin lymphoma. Hodgkin...
Nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) is a type of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), a...

Nodular Lymphocyte-Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma: Your Guide

Nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) is a type of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), a...
Lymphoma is broadly categorized into two groups: Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL)....

Navigating the Different Types of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Lymphoma is broadly categorized into two groups: Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL)....
Hodgkin lymphoma, sometimes called “Hodgkin disease,” is a type of blood cancer called a “...

What You Need To Know About Hodgkin Lymphoma: Symptoms, Treatment, and Prognosis

Hodgkin lymphoma, sometimes called “Hodgkin disease,” is a type of blood cancer called a “...
MyLymphomaTeam My lymphoma Team

Thank you for signing up.

close